Chhattisgarh jewelry is the beauty of the cultural specialty of Chhattisgarh that lies in the ornaments here.

The diversity of ornaments, classified by age group, social status, and geographical factors, makes it wider and richer.

One dimension of the artistic consciousness of beauty in the form of ornaments has been alive for thousands of years and even today it appears like golden-silver pages.

Its initial end opens with the natural and immovable adornment ‘Godna’.

To protect against sorcery, ghosts, etc., tattooing has been considered essential as a shield of protection in tribal families.

Most of the women get tattooed for the feeling of purity and beauty.

This journey of attraction of form through flower-leaf, and glass-shell is on the path of the continuous experiment.

From rock paintings of cave dwellers, Harappan idols, and ancient terracotta sculptures to age-old artifacts, the historicity of ornaments of different sizes is visible.

 Pandit Kedarnath Thakur in his book Bastar Bhushan (1982) described the ornaments of the Bastar region of Chhattisgarh.

According to his account, Madians wore thick brass and iron cards on their hands and wrists.

 Chhattisgarh has a rich tradition of jewelry that fits almost every part of the body.

There are many different designs for each type.

Type of Chhattisgarh jewelry

Gold, silver, iron, ashtadhatu, bronze, brass, gilt, german and kuskut (alloy) clay, wood, bamboo, lac ornaments are prevalent here in human makeup.

In sixteen ornaments, ‘jewel’ means to receive and ‘Bhushan’ means adornment.

There is a practice of marking clan symbols on tribal jewelry.

Jewelry is also a symbol of religious belief, philosophical thinking, aesthetic sense and social organization.

 

Use of Chhattisgarh jewelry

In the culture of Chhattisgarh, there is a separate identity and hallmark of jewelry.

Precious metals and gems have been used since the primitive age, from natural and vegetable production to social development.

By adopting relatively natural and attractive natural and attractive materials like wood, bamboo, flowers, leaves, feathers, glass, shell, and stone, decorated with aesthetic sense, pride is actually a result of inner beauty, while various uses of precious metals and gems.

Since Chhattisgarh’s jewelry is a symbol of the state’s cultural and artistic glory

Since ancient times, people have had a craving for jewels.

Flowers, leaves, and feathers were widely used to adorn the human body, as were shells, stones, wooden cubes, and bones, typically in Aboriginal traditions.

The use of metal jewelry in India usually goes back to ancient traditions. 

 

 Most of the traditional decorations, especially those made of bronze, are now rarely used in Chhattisgarh.

Particularly in the Bastar region, many bronze decorations such as penjna and perri were previously made by casters.

Sometimes they are still made to order in Kondagaon, Barkay, and Jagdalpur.

The main centers for making these ornaments were the villages of Champa and Ratanpur in the Bilaspur district, Dhamda in Durga, and Aring in Raigarh.

But today, in a place like Champa,  home to hundreds of goldsmith families, you’d have to struggle to find at least one bronze bracelet.

It is also difficult to find artisans who make jewelry. 

 Although older generations continue to wear these trinkets, their popularity has waned.

Traditional decorations are no longer available.

 

 

Chhattisgarh jewelry 

Chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

 Among the older types of ornaments still in use are kardhan, phulli, painjna, bidhu, tora, and maldar.

Some traditional jewelry is still made of silver.

New designs are being created in places like Bilaspur, Champa, and Mungeli.                     

Gilat polished gemstones are usually sold in the weekly market. 

 

 

 An interesting feature of  Chhattisgarh jewelry is that it is more than just a body decoration.

They are very flashy, but they also make a difference to the shape and physique of the wearer.

 

 The tribal communities of Chhattisgarh have a tradition of decorating their bodies as part of their identity and style.

Ornaments are made for every part of the body, including the toes and hair.

They may be classified according to the part of the body for which they are intended. 

 

 The major groups of jewelry in Chhattisgarh are listed below

 

Chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

 Ornaments for fingers and toes 

  Angushthana 

 Ornaments for the legs 

  Bichhiya 

 

Bichhiya is for the toes and is worn only by married women. Bichia is not popular among women in tribal communities. Depending on the budget, it is made of silver or gold. Varying in size from 0.5 inches to 2 inches and weighing from 2 grams to 200 grams, the bikes are made by stamping and soldering. Common designs are kalashdar, itakat, gol, and machli.

 

 Peri 

 Peri decorations are usually for legs at the ankles and are worn by rural women, including tribal women. Made mainly of silver, gilat, and dalda (an alloy of metals), they vary in size from 4 to 5 inches and weigh 100  to 200 g. Peri is floral and made of die and wire. 

 Santi/Sati 

 Santi (sati) is another type of anklet worn by married women in the Gonda, Binjhwara, Vaisha, Sahu, and Brahmin communities. It is fixed with screws.

Sati is made of silver or gilat and weighs between 50 and 500 grams. 

 

 Paijeb 

 Pejeb or Pajeb, an anklet ornament, is worn only by married Satnami women of Chhattisgarh. Fasten with screws or clips made of silver or gilat.  

 Paijab is given to a girl upon marriage. There are many designs. This item is made by several jewelers, but the main supply is sourced elsewhere. It measures 9 inches in size and weighs 100-300 grams. The most common designs in piejeb are the chiripan (2-3 layers) and jalibali. It is made by stamping, bending and soldering. 

 

 Lachcha 

 Lachha are anklets worn by women and fastened with screws. Gilate and Silver are used as materials. Made by cutting, bending, soldering, and stamping, Lakcha is 8 to 10 inches in size and weighs 100  to 500 grams.

 Painjan 

 Toda/Tora 

 This is another type of anklet available in Gilat and Sterling Silver. They are hollow and used by both women and children. 

 Kada/Kara 

 This is another type of anklet available in Gilat and Sterling Silver.

 

 Payal 

 Payal is a modern anklet worn by women in villages or villages. Available in sterling silver or gilat, with a maximum solder weight of approximately 600g. 

 Anwat 

 This is a toe ring. It is available in brass, copper, silver and gilat and is popular with the women of Baiga Agaria. 

 Arsijor 

 Choora 

 These are anklets used by women in tribal communities. It is made of silver and has a simple design. 

 Kathal 

  Kathal is another traditional hollow anklet used by Agariya and Raut women in the region. It is made of silver and  very rarely  of gilat. Weight varies from 160 g to 1000 g. It is a hollow tube with flat spikes like  jackfruit (catala), hence the name. 

 Rajmol 

 Ornaments for the waist 

  Kardhan/Kardhani 

 Kardhan  is an ornament worn by women of almost all tribes and castes in Chhattisgarh,  especially the Satnams. This is a clip-type waist belt designed to reduce belly fat for mothers after childbirth. It is worn only by married women who are not widowed. Cardan comes in a variety of designs (especially jalar and chainface), silver or gilat, depending on your budget. Typically, sizes range from 25 inches to 38 inches depending on your waist size. The weight varies from 200g to 2000g depending on the material and design desired by the customer. Cardan is made by brazing wire (silver or gilate) using a die and mold. 

 Kamarpatta 

 This loin ornament is  worn by women of all castes. It has a hollow  shape and is made of silver and gilat. 

Jhaljal

The metal craftsmanship of Jhaljal Bastar is very advanced.

Even in today’s times, there are many rare ornaments made of metals such as brass, bronze, and copper. Some of these pieces of jewelry are so unique that they can hardly be found elsewhere.

One such ornament is the Kamar Patta, which is typically worn around the waist.

While a waistband is more commonly seen, Jhalajhal, also known as Ghulghuli in the local language, is also worn around the waist.

During the Mandai Jatras festival, Sirhas wear traditional costumes and unique jewelry that is only seen on them.

The most prominent of these ornaments is the waist belt, which is akin to a chain with round medallions and ghungroos hanging from them.

These earrings and medals are called Gulurka, and at some places, Katikinkanimal mentions the name Jhalajal.

When the Goddess arrives and Sirha dances, the sacred music emanates from the ghunghrus of the waistband.

 Ornaments for the hands and fingers 

Chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

 Dauriya Parchhaiya 

 This is a popular traditional female ornament worn on the finger. It is made of wire and covers the entire hand and all five fingers. 

 Mundari 

 This ring is used for weddings. Angusthana is the thumb and Ching Mundri is the little finger. The women of the Sahu and Dewangan communities are particularly fond of this decoration. 

 Lapeta 

 Angoothi 

 Jhalar 

 Ornaments for the wrist 

 

 Harraiya 

 A bracelet-like piece of jewelry commonly worn on the wrist by married women from rural and tribal communities in Chhattisgarh. It is made of silver, gilat and brass. The size is  1.5 to 2 inches and the weight varies from 20g to 200g, and is made into a single sheet and molded.

 

 Kada/Kara 

 Kara is another bracelet-like wrist ornament  commonly used in other communities. Made of gilat, brass or silver, depending on your budget. 2-3 Anna size. Weight varies from 60 g to 300 g. It is made with a simple bend. Vanoria (Kantavali) 

 Banoriya (Katawali) 

 This is a traditional ornament worn on the arm of Chhattisgarh women. Available in silver or gilet. 

 Kakani 

 Kakni – wrist decoration in the form of a bracelet. Almost all rural and tribal women wear  kakni. It is made of silver and gilat. Max weight 150g. Patterns of tincatia, panchkatia, etc. 

 Churi 

 Churi is another bracelet decoration worn by women. It is made of silver or gilat and worn during festivals. The weight varies and can go up to 250 g. Churi comes in many designs such as laharia, hirakut, belahuri, bhatia, and batar. 

 Chain Kada 

 A collar chain is a type of  silver or gilat bracelet worn around the wrist. Weight varies from 50 g to 200 g.

 

 Ornaments for the arms 

 

 Nagmori 

  Nagmori are bracelets worn by tribal women and are especially popular in the Gond, Agaria and Raut communities.   has the face of a snake and is made of silver or gilat. The weight of the nagmori varies from 200g to 1000g and is made using seal and wire. 

 Bahuta 

 Phulwala Bahuta 

 Bajuband 

 Gajra 

 Kalivari 

 Tabiz 

 Pahuchi 

 Ornaments for the neck 

Chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

 Necklace 

 Recently, necklaces have become very fashionable among villagers. It is made of gold or silver and is worn by the upper castes. The weight of the necklace can range from 10g to 60g depending on your budget. Stamping and embossing processes are used. sansiri 

 

 Ready-made neck jewelry has recently become very fashionable in the rural community of Bastar. The weight of sanpsirque varies from 10g to 60g, and stamping and embossing processes are used. 

 

 Tilari 

 This is a traditional neck ornament worn by  tribal women in Chhattisgarh. They are made of gold or brass, and sometimes copper. Lacquer beads resembling Amla seeds (Indian gooseberry)  are also used. Modern necklaces have replaced the tilris, dulris and kanth. Kusley, Sutia 

 

 These are traditional neck ornaments used by tribal women. It is made of  silver or gilat and weighs between 20 and 50 tolar (a  little over 11 grams tola). Gusli has a tubular structure. 

 

 Hasuli/Sutiya 

chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

 Kaldar 

 Gotla 

 Dulari 

 This is a traditional neck ornament worn by tribal women in Chhattisgarh. They are made of gold or brass, and sometimes copper. Lacquer beads resembling Amla seeds (Indian gooseberry)  are also used. Modern necklaces have replaced the tilris, dulris and kanth. Kusley, Sutia 

 

 These are traditional neck ornaments used by tribal women. It is made of  silver or gilat and weighs between 20 and 50 tolar (a  little over 11 grams tola). Gusli has a tubular structure. 

 

 Katua 

 This is a traditional neck ornament worn by  tribal women in Chhattisgarh. They are made of gold or brass, and sometimes copper. Lacquer beads resembling Amla seeds (Indian gooseberry)  are also used. Modern necklaces have replaced the tilris, dulris and kanth. Kusley, Sutia 

 

 These are traditional neck ornaments used by tribal women. It is made of  silver or gilat and weighs between 20 and 50 tolar (a  little over 11 grams tola). Gusli has a tubular structure. 

 

 Champakali 

 It is a traditional necklace of the Kanwar tribe. Women who cannot afford dooly or tilly (see below) buy champakali or chapokhla. They are partly made of silver and gold. 

 Charphokla 

 It is a traditional necklace of the Kanwar tribe. Women who cannot afford dooly or tilly (see below) buy champakali or chapokhla. They are partly made of silver and gold. 

 Hamel 

 Kanthimala 

 Dhanmala 

 Ornaments for the nose 

Chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

 

 Phulli 

 It is the most popular nose decoration among the women of Chhattisgarh, especially  Bastar. 

 Phiephir 

 Nath 

 Ornaments for the ears 

Chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

 Jhumka 

 Tops 

 Dhar 

 Tarki 

 Karnphool 

 Khinva 

 Basuni 

 Gona 

 Nasikaphuli 

 Bali 

 Ornaments for the forehead 

 

 Lalat Patti 

 Matha Malai 

 Bal Ka Phool 

 Ornaments for the head/hair 

 

 Clip 

 Choti 

 Jhabli 

 Ornaments now not in use 

 These ornaments were in use until around the time of Independence. Most have been melted to make new ornaments. Very few jewelry artisans remain who have the skills to make these: 

  Bahuti (bronze), worn on the arm 

 Chura (bronze), worn on the leg 

 Tilari 

 Dulari 

 Surra 

Traditional Jewellery of Chattisgarh For Men 

 Not only do women enjoy dressing and accessorizing their clothes, but guys are also interested in numerous types of adornment. 

Tribal men and women use a variety of jewelry for weddings and festivities.  

  During dances, men typically wear Koundhi, a beaded necklace, and a bracelet called Kadhah. Cowries, beads, shells, feathers, and bones are some of the additional things used by tribal communities to decorate themselves. People have had a passion for decoration since time immemorial. 

 Silver is still used today in some traditional jewelry. Freshly designed jewelry comes from areas like Bilaspur, Champa and Mungeli. The weekly market is the place to find stylish Gilat jewelry.

Chhattisgarh jewelry
Chhattisgarh jewelry

Conclusion 

Chhattisgarh’s tribal jewelry is popular not only in the state but also in india for its unique aesthetic appeal.

Both men and women of the tribes living in Chhattisgarh wear jewelry.

In fact, during festivals and festivities, men adorn themselves more carefully than women.

These ornaments are usually made from beads made of wood, seeds, or bone.

They are mainly in the form of fillets, ropes, laces, and collars.

Previously, copper wire, brass, and iron were used to make bracelets, but now they have been replaced by gold and silver. 

  Gold is usually worn around the neck, nose, and ears.

However, it is also common practice for men to wear gold necklaces, indicating their position in the village.

These decorations are not worn on the legs and arms. Silver is used in neck jewelry in the form of hoops.

Legs in the form of solid bracelets with square rods and wrists in the form of loose, hollow, twisted tubular bracelets.

Tapered twin tops are usually worn over the earlobes and nostrils.

The curls on the ears are decorated with beautiful rings. 

 The tribal ornaments of Chhattisgarh do not use many gems, but due to their bright hues, they can sometimes be seen using green and red gems.

Hill Maria men and women wear red wool tassels.

The jewel shops in cities like Kondagaon, Kanker, and Jagdalpur as well as the Khaat bazaars at several venues are the best places to showcase Chhattisgarh’s diverse and beautiful tribal jewelry.

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