The food of Kerala Kerala cuisine is the use of fresh ingredients, aromatic spices, coconut, and a rich variety of dishes that cater to both vegetarian and non-vegetarian preferences.
food of kerala
food of kerala
 

Here are some key elements of Food of Kerala

Popular Dishes-Food of Kerala

  • Kerala Sadya: A traditional vegetarian feast featuring a variety of dishes like sambar, avial, olan, and payasam served on a banana leaf.
  • Appam and Stew: Appam is a fluffy, lacy rice pancake served with a coconut-based stew, often made with potatoes and vegetables.
  • Kerala Parotta: Flaky, layered flatbreads that are popular with meat and vegetable curries.
  • Kerala Fish Curry: A tangy and spicy fish curry made with coconut milk and spices.
  • Puttu and Kadala Curry: Puttu is a steamed rice cake, typically served with kadala (black chickpea) curry.
  • Idiyappam: String hoppers made from rice flour, usually served with coconut milk and sugar or savory curries.

 Desserts

 Kerala has a rich tradition of desserts. Popular options include payasam (a sweet rice pudding), banana fritters, idiyappam (rice and jaggery dumplings), and more.

 Snacks

 Kerala offers a wide range of snacks, including banana chips, jackfruit chips, and various fried snacks like pazhampori (banana fritters) and vada (deep-fried lentil fritters).

Kerala cuisine is known for its intricate flavors, use of local ingredients, and a balance of spicy, sour, and sweet tastes. It is a significant part of the cultural identity of the state and is celebrated for its diversity and richness.

 

 
 

Puttu and kadala curry-Food of Kerala

 
 

Puttu and Kadala Curry is a popular breakfast dish from the Indian state of Kerala. It’s a delightful and hearty combination of steamed rice cakes (puttu) and a flavorful black chickpea curry (kadala curry). This dish is a staple in Kerala and is enjoyed by people of all ages. Here’s how you can prepare Puttu and Kadala Curry:

Ingredients for Puttu-Food of Kerala

  • 1 cup rice flour
  • 1/4 cup grated coconut
  • A pinch of salt
  • Water, as needed

Ingredients for Kadala Curry

  • 1 cup dried black chickpeas (kadala), soaked overnight or for at least 6 hours
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 1 large tomato, finely chopped
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, grated
  • 2-3 green chilies, slit (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder (adjust to taste)
  • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • A few curry leaves
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • Salt to taste
  • Water, as needed
  • Fresh coriander leaves for garnish (optional)

Instructions

For Puttu

  1. Preparing the Rice Flour:
    • Dry roast the rice flour in a pan over low heat for a few minutes until it becomes slightly warm. This step enhances the flavor of the rice flour.
    • Remove from heat and let it cool.
  2. Mixing the Puttu:
    • In a mixing bowl, combine the roasted rice flour, grated coconut, and a pinch of salt.
    • Gradually add water and mix until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs and can hold its shape when pressed.
  3. Steaming Puttu:
    • Fill the cylindrical puttu maker (also called a puttu kutti) with alternating layers of puttu mixture and grated coconut.
    • Steam the puttu in the puttu maker for about 8-10 minutes until it becomes cooked and soft. Remove from the puttu maker.

For Kadala Curry

Cooking Chickpeas

Drain the soaked black chickpeas and rinse them.

In a pressure cooker, add the chickpeas, enough water, and a pinch of salt. Pressure cook for about 2-3 whistles or until they are tender. Drain and keep aside.

Making Kadala Curry

Heat oil in a pan or kadai over medium heat.

Add mustard seeds and cumin seeds. Let them splutter.

Add chopped onions, minced garlic, grated ginger, and green chilies. Sauté until the onions turn translucent.

Adding Spices

Add turmeric powder, red chili powder, and salt to taste. Stir well.

Tomatoes and Chickpeas

Add the chopped tomatoes and cook until they become soft and the oil starts to separate.

Add the cooked chickpeas (kadala) and stir to coat them with the spices.

Kadala Curry Gravy

Add water to the pan to create a gravy. Adjust the consistency as per your preference.

Let the curry simmer for about 10-15 minutes, allowing the flavors to meld together.

Sprinkle garam masala powder and stir well.

Finishing Kadala Curry

Garnish with curry leaves and fresh coriander leaves if desired.

Remove from heat.

Serving Puttu and Kadala Curry

  • Serve the hot steamed puttu with the flavorful kadala curry on the side. It’s a classic Kerala breakfast dish and is often enjoyed with a side of grated coconut and banana. Enjoy!

 

 
 

Appam with stew

 
 

Appam with Stew is a classic and delicious breakfast or dinner dish from Kerala, a southern state in India.It is a lacy, fermented rice pancake, and it’s typically served with a flavorful coconut-based stew, known as “stew” or “Ishtu.” The combination of soft and fluffy appams with mild and aromatic stew is a favorite among Keralites. Here’s how you can make Appam with Stew:

Ingredients for Appam

  • 1 cup raw rice
  • 1/2 cup cooked rice (preferably parboiled rice)
  • 1/4 cup grated coconut
  • 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • Salt to taste
  • Water, as needed

Ingredients for Stew (Ishtu)

  • 1 cup mixed vegetables (potatoes, carrots, peas), chopped into small pieces
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 1-2 green chilies, slit (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1/2 cup thick coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup thin coconut milk (or use water)
  • 1/2 inch piece of ginger, grated
  • A few curry leaves
  • 1-2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

For Appam

Preparing the Batter

Wash the raw rice thoroughly and soak it in water for about 4-6 hours or overnight.

Drain the soaked rice and add it to a blender.

Add the cooked rice, grated coconut, active dry yeast, sugar, and a pinch of salt.

Grind everything together into a smooth batter, adding water as needed. The batter should be of pouring consistency.

Pour the batter into a large bowl and cover it. Allow it to ferment for about 6-8 hours or overnight. The batter will rise and become slightly bubbly.

Making Appam

After fermentation, give the batter a gentle stir.

Heat an appam pan (a curved-bottom skillet) over medium heat. You can also use a non-stick pan.

Grease the pan with a little oil using a cloth or paper towel.

Pour a ladleful of appam batter into the center of the pan.

Hold the pan’s handles and rotate it quickly in a circular motion to spread the batter evenly on the edges and create a thin lace-like layer in the center.

Cover the pan with a lid and cook for about 2-3 minutes or until the edges become crisp and golden brown, and the center is cooked through.

Remove the appam from the pan and keep it warm.

For Stew (Ishtu)

Cooking the Vegetables

In a saucepan, add the mixed vegetables, thin coconut milk (or water), sliced onions, green chilies, grated ginger, and a pinch of salt.

Cook the vegetables until they become tender, usually about 10-15 minutes.

Preparing the Stew

Once the vegetables are cooked, add the thick coconut milk and stir well.

Heat the stew over low heat, making sure not to boil it, as boiling can cause the coconut milk to curdle.

In a separate small pan, heat oil and add mustard seeds. Let them splutter.

Add curry leaves and sauté for a few seconds.

Pour this tempering over the stew and stir gently.

Remove from heat.

Serving Appam with Stew

Serve hot, soft appams with a generous serving of stew on the side. The combination of appam and stew is delightful and a popular dish in Kerala. Enjoy this traditional South Indian delicacy!

 

 
 

Karimeen pollichathu

 
 

Karimeen Pollichathu is a famous and flavorful Kerala seafood dish made with pearl spot fish (karimeen) that’s marinated in a blend of spices, wrapped in banana leaves, and then pan-fried or grilled. The banana leaves impart a unique fragrance and flavor to the fish. Here’s how you can make Karimeen Pollichathu:

Ingredients

  • 2-4 pearl spot fish (karimeen), cleaned and gutted
  • Banana leaves, cut into squares (for wrapping)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (plus extra for brushing)
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 1-2 green chilies, slit (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder (adjust to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper powder
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala powder
  • Salt to taste
  • A few curry leaves
  • 1-2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Water, as needed

Instructions

Marinating the Fish

In a bowl, mix together the ginger-garlic paste, turmeric powder, red chili powder, coriander powder, black pepper powder, garam masala powder, salt, and lemon juice. Add a little water to form a thick marinade.

Apply the marinade to both sides of the cleaned fish. Allow it to marinate for at least 30 minutes.

Preparing Banana Leaves

Quickly pass banana leaves over an open flame to make them pliable. This step helps soften the leaves and enhances the flavor.

Cut the banana leaves into squares large enough to wrap each fish individually.

Wrapping the Fish

Place a marinated fish on each piece of banana leaf.

Add a few slices of onion, a couple of slit green chilies, and a few curry leaves on top of the fish.

Drizzle a little coconut oil over the fish and the other ingredients.

Folding and Securing

Fold the banana leaf over the fish to form a packet or parcel.

Secure the packet with toothpicks or kitchen twine to prevent it from opening during cooking.

Cooking the Karimeen Pollichathu

Heat coconut oil in a pan over medium heat.

Place the wrapped fish packets in the pan and cook on one side for about 5-7 minutes until the banana leaves turn slightly charred and the fish is cooked.

Carefully flip the packets and cook the other side for another 5-7 minutes.

Serving Karimeen Pollichathu

Remove the packets from the pan.

Gently open the banana leaf parcels and transfer the fish, along with the flavorful spices and garnishes, onto a serving plate.

Serve hot with steamed rice or Kerala-style appam. The banana leaf imparts a unique aroma and flavor to the dish.

Karimeen Pollichathu is a traditional and delightful Kerala seafood specialty that’s cherished for its unique taste and aroma. It’s a must-try for seafood lovers and a signature dish of Kerala cuisine.

 

 
 

Malabar Parotta with Kerala beef curry

 

Malabar Parotta with Kerala beef curry is a popular and delicious dish from the southern Indian state of Kerala. Here’s a brief description of these two components of the meal:

Malabar Parotta

Malabar Parotta, also known as Kerala Parotta, is a type of Indian flatbread that is flaky, soft, and layered. It is made from all-purpose flour, water, and sometimes a bit of ghee or oil.

The dough for the parotta is typically kneaded well and then allowed to rest before being rolled out into thin circles. It is then folded and coiled into layers, similar to the process used to make puff pastry.

These layered dough discs are cooked on a griddle with ghee or oil until they puff up and turn golden brown. This cooking method gives the parotta its distinct layers and texture.

Kerala Beef Curry

Kerala beef curry, also known as “beef roast” or “beef fry,” is a spicy and flavorful beef dish prepared in Kerala’s unique style. It’s a staple in many Kerala households.

The dish features beef pieces, usually from a tougher cut, which are marinated with a mix of spices, including coriander, turmeric, chili powder, ginger, garlic, and black pepper.

The marinated beef is then slow-cooked with onions, tomatoes, and a blend of spices, creating a rich and aromatic gravy.

The curry is simmered until the beef is tender and the flavors have melded together. It’s often garnished with curry leaves, and some recipes may include coconut milk for added creaminess.

When served together, the flaky and soft Malabar Parotta pairs wonderfully with the spicy and flavorful Kerala beef curry. The combination of textures and flavors in this dish is a delightful treat for anyone who enjoys South Indian cuisine.

 

 
 

Erissery or pumpkin and lentil curry

 
 

Erissery is a traditional South Indian and Keralite dish that combines pumpkin (or sometimes yam) and lentils to create a flavorful and nutritious curry. Here’s a description of Erissery:

Ingredients

  • Pumpkin: Typically, pieces of ripe pumpkin are used in Erissery.
  • Lentils: Split red gram (toor dal) or black-eyed peas (vanpayar) are commonly used.
  • Coconut: Grated coconut is an essential ingredient that adds creaminess to the dish.
  • Spices: Mustard seeds, curry leaves, and dried red chilies are often used to temper the dish.
  • Turmeric: For flavor and color.
  • Cumin seeds: These are often roasted and ground to make a spice paste.

Preparation

Cooking Lentils

 Lentils are cooked until soft and then set aside. Toor dal or black-eyed peas are typically used.

Cooking Pumpkin

The pumpkin pieces are cooked until tender. They are sometimes mashed slightly to create a thicker consistency.

Coconut Paste

A coconut paste is prepared by grinding grated coconut with roasted cumin seeds and other spices. This paste is added to the dish to provide flavor and creaminess.

Combining Ingredients

 The cooked lentils, pumpkin, and coconut paste are combined in a pan. Turmeric is added for color and flavor.

Tempering

 In a separate pan, mustard seeds, curry leaves, and dried red chilies are tempered in oil. This tempering is then added to the curry, giving it a wonderful aroma.

Simmering

 The mixture is simmered to allow the flavors to meld together.

Erissery is often served as part of the traditional Kerala Onam Sadya, which is a grand feast consisting of various vegetarian dishes served on a banana leaf. It can be enjoyed with steamed rice or as a side dish with other items like coconut chutney or papadum.

Erissery is loved for its unique combination of sweet and savory flavors, with the sweetness of the pumpkin balancing the spiciness of the coconut and spices. It’s a wholesome and hearty dish that is not only delicious but also nutritious due to the inclusion of lentils and vegetables.

 

 
 

Palada payasam (dessert)

 
 

Palada Payasam is a delectable dessert from the southern Indian state of Kerala. It’s a sweet and creamy rice pudding made with thin strips of rice, milk, sugar, and sometimes flavored with cardamom and garnished with fried cashews and raisins. Here’s how it’s prepared:

Ingredients

  • Rice: Thin strips of rice or rice ada (rice pasta) are traditionally used. These are readily available in stores, but you can also make them at home by grinding soaked rice into a smooth batter and then spreading it thinly and evenly on a greased surface, letting it dry, and cutting it into strips.
  • Milk: Full-fat milk is essential to create the creamy and rich base for the payasam.
  • Sugar: To sweeten the dessert. The amount of sugar used can be adjusted to taste.
  • Cardamom: Ground cardamom or cardamom pods are added for flavor.
  • Ghee: A small amount of clarified butter (ghee) is used to fry the cashews and raisins for garnishing.

Preparation

  1. Cooking Rice Strips: The rice strips are soaked in water to soften them. Then, they are boiled until they become tender and cooked. This can take a bit of time, and you may need to add water and stir occasionally. Once the rice strips are soft, they are drained.
  2. Milk and Sugar: In a separate large, heavy-bottomed pan, bring the milk to a boil. Once it starts boiling, reduce the heat and add the cooked rice strips. Simmer the mixture, stirring occasionally until it thickens.
  3. Sugar and Cardamom: Add sugar and ground cardamom to the mixture. Continue to simmer until the payasam reaches the desired consistency and the sugar has dissolved. The cardamom adds a lovely fragrance to the dessert.
  4. Garnishing: In a small pan, heat ghee and fry cashews and raisins until they are golden brown. Then, add this mixture to the Palada Payasam for added flavor and crunch.

Palada Payasam is traditionally served warm but can also be enjoyed chilled. It is a must-have dessert during Kerala festivals, celebrations, and special occasions. The rich, creamy texture, combined with the sweetness and aroma of cardamom, makes it a delightful treat for anyone with a sweet tooth.

 

 
 

Kerala prawn curry (chemmeen curry)

 
 

Kerala Prawn Curry, also known as Chemmeen Curry, is a popular and flavorful seafood dish from the southern Indian state of Kerala. It’s characterized by its rich and tangy coconut-based gravy, which pairs wonderfully with succulent prawns (shrimp). Here’s a typical recipe for Kerala Prawn Curry:

Ingredients

For the Curry Paste

  • 1 cup grated coconut
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic
  • 1-inch piece of ginger
  • 1-2 green chilies (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1-2 teaspoons of coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon of red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)

For the Curry

  • 300-400 grams of fresh prawns, cleaned and deveined
  • 1 small onion, finely sliced
  • 1-2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 sprig of curry leaves
  • 2-3 tablespoons of oil (preferably coconut oil for an authentic flavor)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon of fenugreek seeds
  • Tamarind pulp, extracted from a small piece of tamarind (adjust to taste)
  • Salt to taste
  • Water

Instructions

Prepare the Curry Paste

In a blender or food processor, combine the grated coconut, chopped onion, garlic, ginger, green chilies, coriander powder, turmeric powder, and red chili powder.

Add a little water and blend to make a smooth paste. Set this curry paste aside.

Cook the Prawns

Heat oil in a deep pan or kadai. Once hot, add the mustard seeds and fenugreek seeds. Allow them to splutter.

Add the finely sliced onion and curry leaves. Sauté until the onions turn translucent.

Add the Curry Paste

Lower the heat and add the prepared curry paste. Sauté for a few minutes, stirring continuously, until the oil starts to separate from the paste.

Add Tomatoes

Then Add the chopped tomatoes and cook until they become soft and the mixture turns into a thick, fragrant masala.

Add Prawns

So, Add the cleaned prawns and sauté for a few minutes until they turn pink and start to curl.

Add Tamarind and Water

Also, Add the tamarind pulp and water to achieve your desired gravy consistency. Season with salt and bring the curry to a gentle simmer.

Simmer and Serve

Allow the prawn curry to simmer for a few more minutes until the prawns are cooked through, and the flavors meld together.

Kerala Prawn Curry is typically served with steamed rice, appam (rice pancakes), or other South Indian bread like dosa or idiyappam. It’s a delightful and aromatic dish that combines the rich flavors of coconut, spices, and seafood, creating a truly memorable culinary experience.

Thalassery biryani-Food of Kerala

 
 

Thalassery Biryani is a famous and aromatic biryani variant from the town of Thalassery in the northern region of Kerala, India. Known for its unique blend of spices and the use of small-grain, fragrant Kaima rice, Thalassery Biryani is a culinary delight. Here’s a typical recipe for Thalassery Biryani:

Ingredients

For the Marination

  • 500 grams of chicken, mutton, or vegetables (your choice)
  • 1/2 cup yogurt (curd)
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 cups of Kaima rice (a fragrant and small-grain variety)
  • Water for cooking the rice
  • 2-3 green cardamom pods
  • 2-3 cloves
  • 1 small piece of cinnamon
  • Salt to taste

 Biryani Masala

  • 2 tablespoons ghee or oil
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon biryani masala powder
  • A handful of fresh mint leaves
  • A handful of fresh coriander leaves
  • Salt to taste

For Layering

  • Ghee for drizzling
  • Saffron strands soaked in warm milk (for color and flavor)
  • Fried onions for garnish

Instructions-Food of Kerala

Marinate the Meat or Vegetables

In a bowl, marinate the meat or vegetables with yogurt, red chili powder, turmeric, and salt. Allow it to marinate for at least 30 minutes.

Cook the Rice

Wash the Kaima rice thoroughly. In a large pot, bring enough water to a boil. Add the rice along with green cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and salt.

Cook the rice until it’s about 70% done. The rice should be slightly undercooked as it will continue to cook when layered with the meat.

Prepare the Biryani Masala

In a separate pan, heat ghee or oil. Add the sliced onions and sauté until they turn golden brown. Remove some of the fried onions for garnishing.

Add ginger-garlic paste and sauté for a couple of minutes. Then, add tomatoes and cook until they soften.

Also Add red chili powder, turmeric, and biryani masala powder. Sauté for a few more minutes.

Add the marinated meat or vegetables and cook until they are partially cooked.

Layer the Biryani

In a heavy-bottomed pot, start by layering the partially cooked rice, followed by a layer of the meat or vegetable mixture.

Sprinkle mint and coriander leaves on each layer. Drizzle ghee and saffron-infused milk over the top layer.

Dum Cooking

Cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid and cook on very low heat (dum cooking) for about 20-25 minutes. This slow cooking allows the flavors to meld together.

Garnish and Serve

Garnish with fried onions before serving. Thalassery Biryani is traditionally served with raita or salna, a spiced gravy.

Thalassery Biryani is known for its distinct flavors, and the use of Kaima rice gives it a wonderful aroma. The layering technique and slow cooking method help infuse the rice and meat or vegetables with the rich and aromatic spices. It’s a must-try for biryani enthusiasts and lovers of South Indian cuisine.

 

 
 

Fish moilee-Food of Kerala

 
 

Fish Moilee, also known as Meen Moilee, is a popular and flavorful South Indian fish curry that hails from the coastal regions of Kerala. This mild and creamy coconut-based fish stew is known for its delicate flavors and use of coconut milk. Here’s a typical recipe for Fish Moilee:

Ingredients

  • 500 grams of fish (commonly used varieties include kingfish, seer fish, or any firm-fleshed fish)
  • 1 cup of thin coconut milk (extracted from grated coconut)
  • 1/2 cup of thick coconut milk (a second extraction from the same coconut gratings)
  • 2-3 green chilies, slit lengthwise
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, finely chopped
  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chili powder (adjust to taste)
  • A few curry leaves
  • 2 tablespoons of coconut oil (for authenticity, but you can use any cooking oil)
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

Marinate the Fish

Clean the fish and cut it into medium-sized pieces.

Marinate the fish with a pinch of turmeric and a little salt. Set it aside while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

Cook the Base

In a deep pan or a clay pot, heat coconut oil over medium heat.

Add mustard seeds and fenugreek seeds. Let them splutter.

Add sliced onions, green chilies, ginger, and garlic. Sauté until the onions turn soft and translucent.

Add Spices

Add turmeric powder and red chili powder. Stir for a minute.

Coconut Milk

Pour the thin coconut milk into the pan. Stir well.

Cook the Fish

Carefully add the marinated fish pieces and gently stir to coat them with the coconut milk. Be gentle to avoid breaking the fish pieces.

Cover the pan and let the fish cook for about 5-8 minutes, or until the fish is just cooked through.

Thicken the Curry

Add the thick coconut milk and curry leaves. Simmer for a few more minutes, allowing the gravy to thicken.

Do not let it boil vigorously, as coconut milk can curdle if overheated.

Season with Salt and Curry Leaves

Add salt to taste and garnish with curry leaves.

Serve Hot

Fish Moilee is best served hot with steamed rice or appam (rice pancakes) to soak up the flavorful and creamy coconut sauce.

Fish Moilee is known for its mild and creamy sauce, which is beautifully balanced with the subtle spiciness of the green chilies. It’s a delightful dish that showcases the rich flavors of South Indian coastal cuisine.

 

 
 

Banana fritters (dessert)

 
 

Banana fritters, also known as Pazham Pori in South India, are a popular and delightful dessert or snack made from ripe bananas. These fritters are deep-fried to golden perfection and have a sweet and slightly crispy exterior with a soft, flavorful banana interior. Here’s a simple recipe for making banana fritters:

Ingredients

  • 2-3 ripe bananas (Nendran bananas or any variety suitable for frying)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons rice flour (optional, for added crispiness)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar (adjust to taste)
  • A pinch of salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder (for color)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda (for fluffiness)
  • Water (as needed)
  • Oil for deep frying

Instructions

Prepare the Batter

In a mixing bowl, combine the all-purpose flour, rice flour (if using), sugar, a pinch of salt, turmeric powder, and baking soda.

Add Water

Gradually add water to the dry ingredients while stirring. Mix until you have a smooth, lump-free batter with a consistency similar to pancake batter. The batter should be thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.

Peel and Slice Bananas

Peel the ripe bananas and cut them into long slices or into rounds, according to your preference.

Heat the Oil

In a deep frying pan or skillet, heat oil over medium heat. You’ll need enough oil for deep frying, typically around 2-3 inches deep.

Dip and Fry

Dip the banana slices into the prepared batter, making sure they are well-coated. Allow any excess batter to drip off.

Carefully place the coated banana slices into the hot oil, one by one.

Fry Until Golden Brown

Also, Fry the banana slices in batches, making sure not to overcrowd the pan. Fry them until they turn golden brown and crispy, which usually takes about 2-3 minutes per side.

Drain Excess Oil

Use a slotted spoon to remove the fried banana fritters from the oil and place them on a plate lined with paper towels. This helps remove any excess oil.

Serve Hot

Banana fritters are best served hot and crispy. Enjoy them as a dessert or snack. They are often paired with a cup of tea or coffee for a delightful treat.

Banana fritters are a simple yet delightful dessert, loved for their sweet and crispy exterior and the soft, warm banana inside. They are a favorite in many South Asian and Southeast Asian cuisines and are often enjoyed as a snack or street food.

 
 

Ela Sadya

Ela Sadya is a traditional and elaborate feast in the Indian state of Kerala, typically served during special occasions, festivals, and celebrations. This vegetarian feast is known for its extensive spread of dishes, served on a banana leaf. It’s a culinary experience that showcases the rich and diverse flavors of Kerala’s cuisine.

Here are some of the key dishes that are commonly included in an Ela Sadya:

The Ela Sadya feast consists of several delicious and traditional dishes served on a banana leaf.

The centerpiece of the meal is steamed white rice, which is usually placed in the center of the leaf.

One of the dishes served is Parippu Curry, a simple yet flavorful lentil curry made with toor dal (split pigeon peas) and spices.

Another dish is Sambar, a spicy and tangy vegetable stew made with lentils and tamarind.

Rasam, a tamarind-based soup flavored with black pepper and cumin, is also served.

Avial is a mixed vegetable curry made with a yogurt and coconut-based gravy, seasoned with curry leaves and coconut oil.

Thorans are dry vegetable dishes made by sautéing vegetables like cabbage, beans, or carrots with grated coconut and a blend of spices.

Kaalan is a mild yogurt-based curry made with yam, raw banana, or plantains.

Olan is a mild curry made with ash gourd and black-eyed peas in a coconut milk-based gravy.

Pachadi is a sweet and tangy yogurt-based dish made with vegetables like cucumber, pineapple, or beetroot.

Pickles, such as mango pickles or lemon pickles, add a spicy and tangy element to the meal.

Papadum is a crispy and thin lentil wafer that adds crunch to the meal.

Banana chips, both ripe and raw, are commonly included. Payasam, a sweet dessert, is typically a type of rice pudding made with jaggery, coconut milk, and spices.

Moru Curry, a simple buttermilk-based curry flavored with coconut and spices, is also served.

Some Ela Sadyas include Appam, a lacy rice pancake, and Parotta, a layered flatbread.

Guests are expected to enjoy the meal with their hands. The varied flavors and textures of the dishes make the Ela Sadya feast a memorable culinary experience that brings the community together.

 

 
 

Parippu Curry (Dal Curry)-Food of Kerala

 
 

Parippu Curry, also known as Dal Curry, is a simple and flavorful lentil dish from the Indian state of Kerala. It is a staple in Kerala cuisine and is often served as part of traditional South Indian meals. Here’s a basic recipe for making Parippu Curry:

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of toor dal (split pigeon peas)
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • Salt to taste
  • Water, as needed
  • For the Tempering:
    • 2 tablespoons of coconut oil (or any cooking oil)
    • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
    • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
    • 2-3 dry red chilies, broken into pieces
    • 1 sprig of curry leaves
    • 2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
    • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • For Garnish:
    • Freshly grated coconut (optional)

Instructions

Rinse and Cook the Lentils

Rinse the toor dal under cold water until the water runs clear.

In a saucepan, combine the rinsed dal with about 2.5 cups of water, turmeric powder, and salt.

Bring it to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook the dal until it’s soft and completely cooked, which usually takes about 20-25 minutes. You may need to add more water if it becomes too thick.

Prepare the Tempering

In a separate small pan, heat the coconut oil over medium heat.

Add mustard seeds and cumin seeds. Allow them to splutter.

Also Add dry red chilies, curry leaves, minced garlic, and chopped onion. Sauté until the onions turn golden brown.

Combine the Tempering with Dal

Once the dal is cooked, add the prepared tempering to it. Stir well to combine all the flavors.

Adjust the Consistency

If the Parippu Curry is too thick, you can add a little hot water to reach your desired consistency.

Garnish:

Parippu Curry is traditionally garnished with freshly grated coconut for added flavor and texture. However, this is optional.

Serve Hot:

Serve Parippu Curry hot with steamed rice, and it can be accompanied by other dishes like vegetable curries, pickles, and pappadum.

Parippu Curry is a comfort food in Kerala and is enjoyed as part of a traditional Kerala meal. It’s a simple yet delicious dish with the nutty flavor of cooked lentils and the aromatic spiciness of the tempering. The combination of ingredients makes it a favorite among South Indian cuisine enthusiasts.

 

Dosa Ghee Roast With Kerala Style Sambar

 
 

Dosa Ghee Roast with Kerala Style Sambar is a classic South Indian breakfast or brunch combination that’s loved for its delicious and savory flavors. It is a thin and crispy dosa that’s cooked with generous amounts of ghee (clarified butter), while Kerala Style Sambar is a flavorful and tangy lentil and vegetable stew. Here’s how you can prepare these two dishes:

Dosa Ghee Roast

Ingredients

For Dosa Batter

  • 1 cup parboiled rice
  • 1/4 cup urad dal (black gram)
  • 1/4 cup poha (flattened rice)
  • 1/4 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • Salt to taste

For Dosa Ghee Roast

  • Ghee (clarified butter) for cooking
  • Dosa batter
  • Salt to taste

Instructions-Food of Kerala

  1. Prepare the Dosa Batter:
    • Wash and soak the parboiled rice, urad dal, poha, and fenugreek seeds in water for about 4-5 hours or overnight.
    • Grind the soaked ingredients into a smooth batter. Add salt and enough water to make a thick, pourable batter. Allow it to ferment for 6-8 hours or until it doubles in volume.
  2. Make the Dosa:
    • Heat a flat non-stick griddle or dosa tava on medium-high heat.
    • Pour a ladleful of dosa batter onto the hot griddle and quickly spread it in a circular motion to make a thin dosa.
    • Drizzle ghee generously around the dosa and let it cook until it turns golden brown and crispy.
    • Fold the dosa in half or roll it and serve hot.

Kerala Style Sambar-Food of Kerala

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup toor dal (split pigeon peas)
  • A small lemon-sized ball of tamarind
  • 2-3 cups mixed vegetables (like drumsticks, eggplant, pumpkin, carrots, etc.)
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1-2 green chilies, slit lengthwise
  • A few curry leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon sambar powder
  • Salt to taste
  • 1-2 tablespoons oil
  • For Tempering:
    • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
    • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
    • A pinch of asafoetida (hing)
    • 2-3 dry red chilies
    • 2 tablespoons grated coconut (optional)
    • 1 sprig of fresh coriander leaves for garnish

Instructions

Cook the Toor Dal

Pressure cook the toor dal with water, turmeric powder, and a few drops of oil until it’s soft and mushy. Set aside.

Soak the Tamarind

Soak the tamarind in warm water for about 15 minutes, then extract the tamarind juice.

Cook the Vegetables

In a large pot, cook the mixed vegetables with salt and enough water until they become tender.

Prepare Sambar Base

In a separate pan, heat oil and add mustard seeds. Let them splutter.

Add cumin seeds, asafoetida, dry red chilies, curry leaves, and grated coconut (if using). Sauté for a minute.

Add chopped onions and green chilies. Sauté until the onions turn translucent.

Add chopped tomatoes, sambar powder, and red chili powder. Cook until the tomatoes become soft.

Combine Everything

Add the tamarind juice and the cooked toor dal to the pot with the cooked vegetables.

Stir in the sautéed base mixture and simmer the sambar for a few minutes, allowing the flavors to meld together.

Garnish

Garnish with fresh coriander leaves.

Serve the crispy Dosa Ghee Roast with Kerala Style Sambar, coconut chutney, and perhaps some potato masala for a complete and delightful South Indian breakfast or brunch. The combination of crispy dosa and tangy sambar is a classic and comforting meal.

 

 

Nadan Kozhi Varuthathu (Spicy Chicken Fry)-Food of Kerala

 
 

Nadan Kozhi Varuthathu, also known as Kerala Spicy Chicken Fry, is a delicious and fiery chicken dish from the South Indian state of Kerala. This dish is characterized by its bold flavors and the use of traditional Kerala spices. Here’s a typical recipe to make Nadan Kozhi Varuthathu:

Ingredients

  • 500 grams of chicken pieces (bone-in or boneless)
  • 2 onions, thinly sliced
  • 2-3 green chilies, slit lengthwise
  • 1 sprig of curry leaves
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, minced
  • 6-8 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1-2 tablespoons of red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (or any cooking oil)
  • Water, as needed
  • A few lemon wedges for garnish

Instructions

Marinate the Chicken:

Combine the chicken pieces in a bowl with turmeric powder, red chili powder, black pepper powder, coriander powder, cumin powder, and salt. Mix well and let it marinate for about 30 minutes.

Heat Oil:

In a deep, heavy-bottomed pan, heat the coconut oil (for an authentic Kerala flavor) or any cooking oil over medium heat.

Add Whole Spices and Aromatics:

Then, Add the fennel seeds and let them sizzle for a few seconds.

Also, Add the sliced onions and sauté until they become golden brown.

Add Ginger, Garlic, and Green Chilies:

Stir in the minced ginger, garlic, green chilies, and curry leaves. Sauté until the raw aroma disappears.

Cook the Marinated Chicken:

Add the marinated chicken pieces to the pan. Sauté the chicken, stirring frequently, until it’s well-cooked and browned. This can take around 20-25 minutes.

Adjust Spices:

Adjust the salt and spice level at this stage, adding more red chili powder or black pepper if needed.

Garnish:

Garnish with fresh curry leaves and lemon wedges.

Nadan Kozhi Varuthathu is traditionally served as an appetizer or side dish in Kerala cuisine. It’s a spicy and flavorful chicken fry that pairs well with steamed rice, parotta, or even as an accompaniment to Kerala meals like the traditional Onam Sadya. Adjust the level of spiciness to suit your taste, and enjoy the bold flavors of this South Indian chicken dish.

Kerala Style Prawn Curry-Food of Kerala

 
 

Kerala Style Prawn Curry is a popular and flavorful seafood dish from the southern Indian state of Kerala. It’s known for its rich and aromatic coconut-based gravy that pairs perfectly with succulent prawns (shrimp). Here’s a recipe for making Kerala Style Prawn Curry:

Ingredients

  • 500 grams of fresh prawns, cleaned and deveined
  • 1 cup grated coconut
  • 1 large onion, finely sliced
  • 2-3 green chilies, slit lengthwise
  • 1 small piece of ginger, minced
  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • A few curry leaves
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (for an authentic flavor)
  • Salt to taste
  • Tamarind pulp (extracted from a small piece of tamarind, adjust to taste)
  • Water

Instructions-Food of Kerala

Prepare the Coconut Paste

In a blender, combine the grated coconut with a little water and blend to make a smooth coconut paste. Set it aside.

Marinate the Prawns

In a bowl, marinate the prawns with turmeric powder, red chili powder, and salt. Set them aside while you prepare the gravy.

Heat Coconut Oil

In a deep pan or a clay pot, heat the coconut oil over medium heat.

Tempering

Add mustard seeds and fenugreek seeds. Let them splutter.

Add sliced onions and green chilies. Sauté until the onions become soft and translucent.

Add Spices and Aromatics

Stir in minced ginger and garlic. Sauté for a couple of minutes until the raw aroma disappears.

Add turmeric powder, red chili powder, coriander powder, and black pepper powder. Sauté for a few more minutes.

Add Coconut Paste

Add the prepared coconut paste to the pan. Stir well and cook for a few minutes until the oil starts to separate from the paste.

Cook the Prawns

Add the marinated prawns to the coconut gravy. Stir to coat the prawns with the mixture.

Add tamarind pulp and enough water to achieve the desired gravy consistency. Season with salt and bring the curry to a gentle simmer.

Simmer and Garnish

Allow the prawn curry to simmer for a few more minutes until the prawns are cooked through and the flavors meld together.

Garnish with curry leaves.

Kerala Style Prawn Curry is best served with steamed rice, appam, or other South Indian bread like dosa or idiyappam. It’s a delightful and aromatic dish that combines the rich flavors of coconut and spices with the succulence of the prawns.

 

Karimeen Pollichathu (Fish)-Food of Kerala

 
 

Karimeen Pollichathu is a famous and delectable Kerala fish dish that features pearl spot fish, known as Karimeen in Malayalam, cooked in a spicy and tangy masala and wrapped in banana leaves. The dish is steamed or roasted, allowing the flavors to infuse the fish, creating a flavorful and aromatic experience. Here’s a recipe for making Karimeen Pollichathu:

Ingredients

  • 2 whole Karimeen (pearl spot fish), cleaned and scaled
  • Banana leaves (or aluminum foil if banana leaves are unavailable)
  • Salt, to taste

For the Marinate

  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
  • Salt, to taste
  • Juice of 1 lemon

For the Masala

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 large onion, finely sliced
  • 1 large tomato, finely sliced
  • 1-2 green chilies, slit lengthwise
  • 1 sprig of curry leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1/2 cup thick coconut milk
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Salt, to taste

Instructions

Marinate the Fish

Make a paste by mixing turmeric powder, red chili powder, ginger-garlic paste, salt, and lemon juice. Apply this paste to the cleaned fish and inside the cavities.

Wrap the Fish in Banana Leaves

If using banana leaves, quickly pass them over an open flame to make them pliable.

Place each fish on a banana leaf, and wrap them tightly. Secure the ends with toothpicks or kitchen twine.

Steam or Roast the Fish

You can either steam the wrapped fish in a steamer for about 15-20 minutes until they are cooked or roast them on a griddle or tawa until they are charred and cooked through. If roasting, flip the fish occasionally to cook evenly.

Prepare the Masala

In a separate pan, heat coconut oil over medium heat.

Add fennel seeds and cumin seeds. Let them splutter.

So, add sliced onions, green chilies, and curry leaves. Sauté until the onions become soft and translucent.

Then Add sliced tomatoes and cook until they are soft and mushy.

Add turmeric powder, red chili powder, coriander powder, and black pepper powder. Sauté for a few more minutes.

Finish the Dish

Pour thick coconut milk into the pan and stir until the masala is well combined with the coconut milk.

Squeeze lemon juice into the mixture and add salt to taste. Simmer for a few more minutes until the masala thickens.

Serve

Carefully unwrap the fish from the banana leaves and place them on a serving plate. Pour the prepared masala over the fish.

Karimeen Pollichathu is best enjoyed with steamed rice. The banana leaves impart a unique and wonderful flavor to the dish. It’s a true delicacy and a must-try for seafood enthusiasts looking to savor the flavors of Kerala cuisine.

 

Kallumakkaya Ularthiyathu (Mussel Stir Fry)-Food of Kerala

 
 

Kallumakkaya Ularthiyathu, also known as Mussel Stir Fry, is a delicious seafood dish from the state of Kerala in South India. It features fresh mussels (kallumakkaya) cooked with a blend of spices, grated coconut, and other aromatic ingredients. Here’s a recipe for making Kallumakkaya Ularthiyathu:

Ingredients

  • 500 grams fresh mussels, cleaned and debearded
  • 1/2 cup grated coconut
  • 1 onion, finely sliced
  • 2-3 green chilies, slit lengthwise
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, minced
  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 sprig of curry leaves
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (for authenticity, but you can use any cooking oil)
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

Prepare the Mussels

Clean the mussels thoroughly, removing any beards and dirt. Rinse them in cold water.

Coarsely Grind the Coconut

In a blender, coarsely grind the grated coconut. Set it aside.

Heat Coconut Oil

In a deep pan or kadai, heat coconut oil over medium heat.

Tempering

Add cumin seeds and fennel seeds. Let them sizzle for a few seconds.

Add sliced onions and green chilies. Sauté until the onions turn golden brown.

Aromatics and Spices

Stir in minced ginger and garlic. Sauté for a couple of minutes until the raw aroma disappears.

Add turmeric powder, red chili powder, and black pepper powder. Sauté for a few more minutes.

Cook the Mussels

Add the cleaned mussels to the pan. Stir well to coat them with the spice mixture.

Cover the pan and cook the mussels for about 10-15 minutes. The mussels should release their own liquid and cook until tender. You don’t need to add additional water.

Add Grated Coconut

Once the mussels are cooked, add the coarsely ground-grated coconut to the pan. Mix well.

Final Seasoning

Season with salt and add curry leaves. Stir and continue to cook for a few more minutes until the coconut is roasted and has absorbed the flavors.

Kallumakkaya Ularthiyathu is traditionally served with steamed rice as part of a Kerala meal or can be enjoyed as an appetizer or side dish. The mussels are tender and flavored with a delicious blend of spices and coconut, making this dish a seafood lover’s delight.

 

 

Erachi Varutharacha Curry (Fried-Ground Mutton Curry)-Food of Kerala

 
 

Erachi Varutharacha Curry, also known as Fried-Ground Mutton Curry, is a flavorful and aromatic meat dish from the South Indian state of Kerala. It features ground or minced mutton (goat or lamb) cooked with a rich and roasted coconut-based gravy. This dish is known for its bold spices and deep, savory flavors. Here’s a recipe for making Erachi Varutharacha Curry:

Ingredients

  • 500 grams of minced mutton (ground mutton)
  • 1 large onion, finely sliced
  • 2-3 green chilies, slit lengthwise
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, minced
  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 large tomato, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup grated coconut
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1-2 tablespoons red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala
  • 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil
  • Salt to taste
  • Water, as needed
  • Curry leaves for garnish

Instructions

Roast the Coconut

In a dry pan, roast the grated coconut over low to medium heat until it turns golden brown. Stir continuously to ensure even roasting. Once it’s golden brown, remove it from the heat and let it cool.

Grind the Coconut

Grind the roasted coconut into a fine paste by adding a little water. Set it aside.

Cook the Mutton

In a deep pan or kadai, heat coconut oil over medium heat.

Add the sliced onions and green chilies. Sauté until the onions become soft and translucent.

Stir in minced ginger and garlic. Sauté for a few minutes until the raw aroma disappears.

Add the chopped tomatoes and cook until they are soft and mushy.

Add turmeric powder, red chili powder, coriander powder, cumin powder, black pepper powder, and garam masala. Sauté for a few more minutes.

Add the minced mutton and cook until it’s browned and cooked through.

Add Ground Coconut Paste

Stir in the ground coconut paste to the mutton mixture. Mix well.

Adjust the Consistency

Add water as needed to achieve your desired gravy consistency.

Season and Garnish

Season with salt and add curry leaves for flavor.

Simmer the curry for a few more minutes until the flavors meld together.

Erachi Varutharacha Curry is typically served with steamed rice, appam, parotta, or even Kerala-style porotta. This dish is known for its rich, roasted coconut-based gravy and the bold spices that create a flavorful and hearty meat dish.

 

Ada Pradhaman-Food of Kerala

 
 

Ada Pradhaman is a classic dessert from the South Indian state of Kerala. It’s a rich and flavorful pudding made with rice flakes (ada), jaggery, coconut milk, and various aromatic spices. This dessert is often prepared during special occasions and festivals in Kerala. Here’s a recipe for making Ada Pradhaman:

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rice ada (rice flakes)
  • 1 cup jaggery, grated
  • 1 can (400 ml) of thick coconut milk
  • 1 can (200 ml) of thin coconut milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon dry ginger powder (optional)
  • A pinch of salt
  • 2-3 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter)
  • 10-15 cashew nuts
  • 10-15 raisins
  • A few crushed cardamom pods
  • Edible camphor (optional, for aroma)
  • A few strands of saffron (optional, for color)
  • Water, as needed

Instructions

Prepare the Rice Ada

Wash the rice ada in cold water and soak it in water for about 30 minutes. After soaking, drain and set it aside.

Cook the Rice Ada

In a deep pan or heavy-bottomed vessel, bring water to a boil.

Add the soaked and drained rice ada to the boiling water. Cook until it becomes soft and tender. This usually takes about 5-7 minutes. Drain the cooked ada and rinse it with cold water to remove excess starch. Set it aside.

Prepare Jaggery Syrup

In another pan, melt the grated jaggery with a little water to make a thick syrup. Strain to remove impurities and set the syrup aside.

Combine Ada and Jaggery

In the same pan, add the cooked and drained rice ada to the jaggery syrup. Mix well and cook for a few minutes.

Add Thin Coconut Milk

Add the thin coconut milk and bring the mixture to a gentle simmer. Allow it to cook for a few more minutes until the flavors meld together.

Season with Spices

Stir in cardamom powder and dry ginger powder. If you’re using saffron or edible camphor, add them at this stage. These are optional but can enhance the flavor.

Prepare the Tempering

In a separate small pan, heat the ghee. Add cashew nuts and raisins and sauté until they turn golden brown. Remove and set them aside.

Final Touch

Add the thick coconut milk to the ada mixture and stir well. Do not let it boil; just let it heat through.

Add the cashew nuts and raisins along with the ghee to the pradhaman.

Serve

Ada Pradhaman is best served warm or at room temperature.

Ada Pradhaman is a sweet and aromatic dessert enjoyed during special occasions and celebrations in Kerala. The combination of jaggery, coconut milk, and spices makes it a delightful treat for those with a sweet tooth.

 

Chatti Pathiri-Food of Kerala

 
 

Chatti Pathiri is a traditional layered pastry dish from the Indian state of Kerala. It’s often prepared during special occasions and festivals. Chatti Pathiri is made by layering thin pancakes filled with a mixture of eggs, chicken, or other fillings. The dish is then baked in a pan or traditional clay pot, giving it a unique flavor and texture. Here’s a basic recipe for making Chicken Chatti Pathiri:

Ingredients

For the Pancakes

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • A pinch of salt
  • Water, as needed

 the Chicken Filling

  • 500 grams of boneless chicken, minced
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2-3 green chilies, chopped (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, minced
  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • A handful of curry leaves

For Assembling

  • Ghee (clarified butter) or cooking oil, as needed
  • Beaten eggs for brushing the layers

Instructions

Prepare the Pancake Batter

In a mixing bowl, combine the all-purpose flour, eggs, a pinch of salt, and enough water to make a smooth, runny batter. This will be used to make thin pancakes.

Make Pancakes

Heat a non-stick or crepe pan over medium heat.

Pour a ladleful of the batter and quickly swirl the pan to spread it evenly into a thin pancake.

Cook for a minute or two until the pancake is set, then flip and cook the other side briefly. Continue making pancakes until you use up the batter.

Prepare the Chicken Filling

Heat oil in a pan and add chopped onions. Sauté until they become translucent.

Add minced ginger, garlic, and green chilies. Sauté for a few more minutes.

Stir in the minced chicken and cook until it’s no longer pink.

Add turmeric powder, red chili powder, garam masala, and salt. Cook until the chicken is cooked through. Add curry leaves and remove from heat.

Assemble Chatti Pathiri

Take a wide and shallow non-stick pan or a traditional clay pot (if available). Grease the bottom with ghee or cooking oil.

Place one pancake at the bottom.

Brush with beaten egg.

Add a portion of the chicken filling and spread it evenly.

Place another pancake on top and brush with beaten egg.

Repeat the process, layering pancakes and chicken filling, until you’ve used up all the pancakes and filling. The top layer should be a pancake brushed with egg.

Bake the Chatti Pathiri

Preheat your oven to 180°C (350°F).

Cover the pan with aluminum foil and bake in the preheated oven for about 20-25 minutes or until the top becomes golden brown.

Serve

Allow the Chatti Pathiri to cool slightly before slicing and serving. It’s often enjoyed as a snack or during festive meals.

Chatti Pathiri is a unique and delicious dish with layers of savory pancakes and flavorful chicken filling. The final bake in the oven gives it a wonderful texture and aroma. You can customize the filling to your preference, including vegetarian options with vegetables or eggs.

 

 
 

Coconut Toddy-Food of Kerala

 
 

Coconut Toddy, also known as “Kallu” in Malayalam, is a traditional alcoholic beverage from the Indian state of Kerala. It is made from the sap of coconut palms and is a popular drink in many parts of Kerala. Here’s how it’s typically prepared:

Ingredients

  • Freshly tapped coconut sap (from the flower bud of a coconut palm tree)
  • A container for collecting the sap
  • A bamboo or plastic tube for tapping the sap

Instructions

Tapping the Sap

To make Coconut Toddy, you first need to tap the sap from a flowering coconut palm tree. This is typically done by a skilled tapper who climbs the tree and attaches a container to collect the sap. A bamboo or plastic tube is often used to direct the sap into the container.

Collecting the Sap

The sap is collected in the container, usually during the early hours of the day, as it is most plentiful at that time. The tapper may make a few incisions in the tree and attach tubes to collect the sap efficiently.

Fermentation

Once the sap is collected, it is left to ferment naturally. This process can take a few hours to a day, depending on the ambient temperature and other factors. During fermentation, the naturally occurring yeasts in the environment convert the sugars in the sap into alcohol.

Consuming Coconut Toddy

Coconut Toddy is typically enjoyed fresh and is known for its sweet, mildly alcoholic taste. It’s often consumed on the same day it’s collected to capture its freshness and mild alcohol content.

 

 

 
 

Banana Halwa-Food of Kerala

 
 

Banana Halwa or “Banana Sheera” or “Banana Kesari,” is a sweet and delicious dessert made from ripe bananas, semolina (sooji), sugar, and ghee (clarified butter). It’s a popular Indian dessert known for its rich flavor and smooth, melt-in-your-mouth texture. Here’s a recipe for making Banana Halwa:

Ingredients

  • 3 ripe bananas, mashed
  • 1 cup semolina (sooji)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup ghee (clarified butter)
  • A handful of cashews and raisins
  • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom powder
  • A pinch of saffron strands (optional)
  • A few drops of yellow food color (optional)
  • Water, as needed
  • A pinch of salt

Instructions

Prep Work

Mash the ripe bananas into a smooth paste and set them aside.

If using saffron strands, soak them in a tablespoon of warm milk and set them aside.

Prepare a plate or tray by greasing it with a little ghee.

Roast Semolina

Heat a heavy-bottomed pan or kadai over medium heat. Add the semolina (sooji) and roast it until it turns golden brown and emits a nutty aroma. Stir continuously to ensure even roasting. This should take about 7-8 minutes.

Prepare Sugar Syrup

In another saucepan, heat 2 cups of water. Add sugar and a pinch of salt. Stir until the sugar dissolves. Bring it to a boil. Once it comes to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for a few minutes to create a sugar syrup. It should be a little thick but not overly so.

Cook Semolina

Pour the sugar syrup into the roasted semolina slowly while stirring continuously to avoid lumps. Be cautious as it may splatter.

Continue to cook and stir until the semolina absorbs the sugar syrup and the mixture thickens. This should take about 5-7 minutes.

Add Mashed Bananas

Add the bananas to the semolina mixture. Mix well.

Add Ghee and Flavorings

In another small pan, heat the ghee. Add cashews and raisins and sauté until they turn golden. Add the saffron-infused milk (if using) and a few drops of yellow food color (if using) to the ghee. Pour this ghee mixture into the semolina and banana mixture.

Simmer and Flavor

Continue to cook the mixture on low heat, stirring continuously, until it thickens and leaves the sides of the pan. This should take about 10-12 minutes.

Stir in the cardamom powder and mix well.

Transfer to a Plate

Once the Banana Halwa is thick and leaves the sides of the pan, transfer it to the greased plate or tray. Flatten it with a spatula.

Cool and Serve

Allow the Banana Halwa to cool for a few hours. Once it’s set, cut it into desired shapes and serve.

 

 

 
 

Thattu Dosa with Chutney-Food of Kerala

 
 

Thattu Dosa, also “Street-style Dosa” or “Thatte Idli Dosa,” is a popular South Indian street foo for its large, crispy, and thin dosas.

Here’s a recipe for making Thattu Dosa and a simple coconut chutney:

Ingredients

For Thattu Dosa

  • 2 cups dosa batter (fermented)
  • Oil or ghee for cooking

For Coconut Chutney

  • 1 cup grated coconut
  • 2-3 green chilies (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1/2 cup roasted chana dal (split roasted chickpeas)
  • 1/2 inch piece of ginger
  • A small piece of tamarind
  • Salt to taste
  • Water, as needed

Instructions-Food of Kerala

For Thattu Dosa-Food of Kerala

  1. Heat the Griddle:
    • Heat a flat griddle (tava) over medium-high heat. It’s important to have a large tava or a dosa griddle for making thattu dosa.
  2. Ladle the Batter:
    • Take a ladleful of the dosa batter and pour it in the center of the heated griddle.
  3. Spread the Batter:
    • Quickly, using the bottom of the ladle, spread the batter in a circular motion to form a thin and large dosa. The edges may be slightly thicker for crispiness.
  4. Drizzle Oil or Ghee:
    • Drizzle a little oil or ghee around the dosa’s edges and on top. This will help it become crisp.
  5. Cook the Dosa:
    • Cook the dosa until it becomes golden brown and crispy. It should start to leave the edges of the griddle.
  6. Flip and Cook:
    • Gently flip the dosa over and cook for a minute or so on the other side.
  7. Remove and Serve:
    • Once the dosa is evenly cooked and crispy, remove it from the griddle and serve hot.

For Coconut Chutney-Food of Kerala

  1. Prepare the Chutney:
    • In a blender, combine grated coconut, green chilies, roasted chana dal, ginger, tamarind, and salt.
  2. Blend:
    • Blend the ingredients, adding water as needed to achieve the desired chutney consistency. It should be smooth and well-mixed.
  3. Serve:
    • Transfer the chutney to a serving bowl and serve it with the thattu dosa.

Thattu Dosa is a delightful and crispy South Indian street food. It’s perfect for breakfast, lunch, or as a snack. The coconut chutney complements the dosa beautifully, and you can also serve it with sambar for a complete meal.

 

 

Sadhya-Food of Kerala

It is a traditional vegetarian feast from the South Indian state of Kerala.

Sadhya is a delightful and rich culinary tradition in Kerala.

The flavors, textures, and combinations of dishes in Sadhya provide a wonderful culinary experience that showcases the unique and diverse vegetarian cuisine of Kerala.

 

 

Pathiri-Food of Kerala

 
 

It is a popular South Indian dish, particularly in the state of Kerala. Pathiri refers to a type of rice pancake or flatbread that is from ground rice and water. These rice-based flatbreads are soft, thin, and typically served as a staple food in Kerala, often accompanying various curries and side dishes. There are different varieties of pathiri, each with its unique preparation method. Here are a few common types of pathiri

1. Pathiri (Rice Pancakes)

  • These are soft, thin rice pancakes made by mixing rice flour with water and salt to create a dough. The dough is roll up into small rounds and cook on a griddle or flat pan.

2. Neypathiri (Ghee Rice Pancakes)

  • These rice pancakes are similar to regular ones but are cook in ghee (clarified butter), which imparts a rich and buttery flavor. 

3. Ari Pathiri (Malabar Rice Roti)

  • Ari is a thicker rice bread. It is by mixing rice flour with water, salt, and sometimes grated coconut to form a dough, which is then rolled into round shapes and cooked on a griddle.

4. Erachi Pathiri (Stuffed Meat Pathiri)

  • This is a specialty dish that is stuffed with a spicy minced meat mixture before cooking.

5. Vellayappam (White Appam or Rice Hoppers)

  • Vellayappam is a delicate and lacy rice pancake made from fermented rice batter. It’s a popular breakfast dish in Kerala and is often with coconut milk, stew, or other curries.

 

 

 

Pidi-Food of Kerala

 
 

Pidi, also known as “Pidiyum Kozhiyum,” is a traditional South Indian dish, particularly popular in the state of Kerala. It is a dumpling-like dish made from rice flour and is often with a flavorful and aromatic chicken curry. Here’s a basic recipe for making a simple chicken curry:

For Pidi (Rice Dumplings)-Food of Kerala

Ingredients

  • 2 cups rice flour
  • 2 cups water
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Boil Water:
    • In a saucepan, bring 2 cups of water to a boil.
  2. Add Rice Flour:
    • Add rice flour and salt to the boiling water.
  3. Stir and Cook:
    • Stir the mixture continuously and cook until it forms a thick dough. This dough is “kanji.”
  4. Shape the Dumplings:
    • Allow the kanji to cool slightly. Then, take small portions of the dough and shape them into small oval or dumpling-like pieces. You can shape them by hand or using the back of a fork.
  5. Steam the Dumplings:
    • Place the pidis in a steamer or idli maker and steam for about 15-20 minutes

For Chicken Curry-Food of Kerala

Ingredients

  • 500 grams of chicken, cut into pieces
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2-3 green chilies, slit lengthwise (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, minced
  • 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 tomatoes, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1-2 tablespoons red chili powder (adjust to your spice preference)
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • Curry leaves for garnish
  • Water, as needed
  • Fresh coconut milk (optional)

Instructions-Food of Kerala

Sauté the Onions

In a deep pan or kadai, heat oil over medium heat. Add chopped onions and green chilies. Sauté until the onions turn translucent.

Add Ginger and Garlic

Stir in minced ginger and garlic. Sauté for a few minutes until the raw aroma disappears.

Add Tomatoes and Spices

Add the chopped tomatoes, turmeric powder, red chili powder, coriander powder, and salt. Cook until the tomatoes become soft and the oil starts to separate from the mixture.

Cook the Chicken

Add the chicken pieces and cook until they turn opaque.

Simmer and Finish

Add garam masala and curry leaves. Simmer the curry, adding water as needed, until the chicken is tender and the curry reaches the desired consistency. If you prefer, you can also add fresh coconut milk for extra richness.

To serve, place the steamed pidis on a plate and pour the chicken curry over them. Pidi and chicken curry make for a delicious and comforting meal, and the dumplings absorb the flavors of the curry, making every bite a delightful experience.

 

 
 
 
 

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